Bank Holidays 2014

What are Bank Holidays?

Bank Holidays were first started in the UK in 1871. Originally only 4 days; Easter Monday, Whit Monday, the first Monday in August, and Boxing Day, bank holiday dates have now been expanded to include all of the days you find below. Although there it is no set rule that says one must have the day off, thankfully, many do. All banks close, and most people use their bank holidays to relax, shop and eat.

The Dates

Jan 1st – New Year’s Day
Apr 18th – Good Friday
Apr 21st – Easter Monday
May 5th – Early May Bank Holday
May 26th – Spring Bank Holiday
Aug 25th – Summer Bank Holiday
Dec 25th – Christmas Day
Dec 26th – Boxing Day

Jan 1st – New Year’s Day
Jan 2nd – Second of January
Apr 18th – Good Friday
May 5th – Early May Bank Holiday
May 26th – Spring Bank Holiday
Aug 4th – Summer Bank Holiday
Nov 30th – St Andrew’s Day
Dec 25th – Christmas Day
Dec 26th – Boxing Day

Jan 1st – New Year’s Day
Mar 17th – St Patrick’s Day
Apr 18th – Good Friday
Apr 21st – Easter Monday
May 5th – May Bank Holiday
May 26th – Spring Bank Holiday
Jul 12th – Battle of the Boyne (Orangemen’s Day)
Jul 14th – Battle of the Boyne Substitute (the 12th falls on Saturday)
Aug 25th – Summer Bank Holiday
Dec 25th – Christmas Day
Dec 26th – Boxing Day


We love Bank Holidays

They’re a great opportunity to give the house a spring clean, wash the cars, take the dog to the park, or even enjoy a long weekend city break with your loved ones.
Bank Holidays are an opportunity to take the day off work and enjoy your free time. Most of us are granted an extra day off to do with what we’d like, but those in the service and retail industries will often experience their busiest days of trade, and thus will be expected to work (hopefully for an increased rate of pay!).

Bank vs Public Holidays

A bank holiday is a public holiday, but not vice versa! Most people will find that they are granted time off on both bank and public holidays, although some industries have their busiest periods during this time!